Mental Health Disorder Statistics

Mental Health Disorder Statistics Overview

1 in every 8 people in the world right now is living with some form of mental health disorder.

1 in every 8 people in the world right now is living with some form of mental health disorder.

The number of people with a mental health issue of any kind went up by 20% from 1993 to 2014.

970 million people across the globe were living with some form of mental health disorder in 2019.

4 of the 10 leading causes of disability in the United States come about as a result of people who have at least one mental disorder.

Untreated depression and anxiety disorders are estimated to have cost the entire global economy more than $1 trillion in lost productivity in 2020.

21% of American adults over 18 had some form of mental illness in 2020.

5.6% of all American adults over 18 had at least one episode of serious mental illness in 2020.

15.3% of all those who enlist in the armed forces have been found to have at least one mental illness in 2019.

2020 saw a rise in the number of people who were diagnosed with anxiety and depressive disorders as a result of dealing with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

2020 saw a rise in the number of people who were diagnosed with anxiety and depressive disorders as a result of dealing with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Anxiety disorders increased by 26% in 2020.

Episodes of major depressive disorders increased by 28% in 2020.

26% of all Americans over the age of 18 will have what is considered to be a diagnosable mental disorder at some point in any given year.

18% of all Americans from the ages of 18 to 54 will be diagnosed with an anxiety disorder in a given year.

Many people who have a mental health disorder have more than mental health disorder at the same time. People who suffer from depression are also likely to be more vulnerable to anxiety disorders as well as substance abuse problems.

9.5% of all American adults who are over the age of 18 will have an episode of major depression or suffer from bipolar disorder, or an episode of dysthymia in any given year.

2.6% of all Americans over the age of 18 have a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders?

Both American men and women are equally likely to suffer from bipolar disorder.

14 million people across the globe had some form of an eating disorder in 2019.

21 million Americans had at least one episode of depression in 2020. This is 8.4% of the American population.

1.5 million Americans have had a diagnosis of schizophrenia from a health professional.

9 million Americans have been officially diagnosed with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. This is 3.6% of the American public.

Americans who identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual report a 47.4% rate of mental health illness symptoms.

People who have been given a formal diagnosis of depression have been found to have a 40% higher risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases than those who do not have depression.

People who have been given a formal diagnosis of major mental health issues have been found to have a 50% higher risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases than those who do not have such mental health issues.

17 million Americans who have a mental illness of all any kind have also experienced a substance use disorder in 2020.

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/mental-illness

6.4% of Americans who have at least one mental health issue report they are unemployed. Americans who do not have a mental health issue report a 5.1% rate of unemployment.

8.4 million Americans are providing care to someone over the age of 18 with a mental health disorder in the United States.

Americans who provide care for someone with a mental health issue report spending 32 hours a week in unpaid labor assisting people who need their help.

1 out of every 8 visits to the Emergency Room in the United States took place as a result of a mental health issue.

The most common cause of hospitalization for all people in the United States under the age of 45 were mood disorders.

20.8% of all Americans who report experiencing at least some time coping with homelessness in the United States state they have at least one serious mental health condition.

37% of all American adults who were behind bars in either the state or the federal prison system have been found to have a diagnosed mental illness during their stay in jail or prison.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders for Men?

Men are 4 times more likely to commit suicide than women.

Caucasian men over 85 are the demographic group in the United States most likely to commit suicide.

Schizophrenia typically appears in American men when they are in late teens or as they start to hit their early 20s.

1 in 8 men have reported they have experienced at least one or more symptoms that may indicate an underlying mental health problem.

35.2% of men believe they have had some form of diagnosable mental health issue during the course of their lives.

19.5% of men have had their diagnosis of mental illness officially confirmed by a medical professionals.

40% of all men who were surveyed admitted that it would take multiple thoughts of committing suicide or engaging in some form of self-harm before they would feel compelled to seek professional help for a mental health disorder.

37.4% of all American men with a mental health disorder got treatment for their illness each year.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders for Women?

37.4% of all American women with a mental health disorder got treatment for their illness each year.

51.2% of women have had their diagnosis of mental illness officially confirmed by a medical professionals.

51.2% of women believe they have had some form of diagnosable mental health issue during the course of their lives.

Women are 2 times as likely to suffer from depression as men.

1 in 5 women have reported they have experienced at least one or more symptoms that may indicate an underlying mental health problem.

Women try to commit suicide 2 times as often as men. Women are far less likely to have an attempt at suicide that ultimately works.

Women are twice as likely as men to get help for any form of mental disorder.

Women are twice as likely as men to get help for any form of mental disorder.

Schizophrenia typically appears in American women when they are in early twenties or as they start to hit their early 30s.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders for Children?

50% of all lifetime mental illness will begin in suffers by the time they reach the age of 14.

For children and teens between the ages of 10 and 14, suicide is the second leading cause of death in the United States.

3 million children across the globe are known to have an eating disorder in 2019.

58 million children across the globe had an anxiety disorder in 2019.

23 million children across the globe had depression in 2019.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders for Teens?

70% of all American teens who enter the juvenile justice system at some point in time have been found to have a diagnosable mental health condition.

16.5% of all American young people between the ages of 6 and 17 have experienced t least one mental health disorder in 2016.

Panic disorder starts to develop for American teens in their late adolescence or as they start early adulthood.

Obsessive Compulsive disorder commonly shows up for American teens as they approach their late teens.

40 million children across the globe had disruptive behavior and dissocial disorders in 2019.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders for Adults?

15% of all adults who are over 60 suffer from at least one mental disorder that needs treatment.

The average age of the first episode of major depression is 25.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders for Causes?

Nearly everyone who commits suicide has an undiagnosed or diagnosed mental health disorder.

Nearly everyone who commits suicide has an undiagnosed or diagnosed mental health disorder.

301 million people across the globe had an anxiety disorder in 2019.

1% of all Americans will be diagnosed with schizophrenia at some point in time.

280 million people across the globe were living with depression in 2019.

40 million people across the globe are known to be living with bipolar disorder in 2019.

24 million people across the globe are known to suffer from some form of schizophrenia in 2019.

What are the Most Common Mental Health Disorders Treatments?

Only 29% of people across the globe who had some form of psychosis received any kind of treatment in 2019.

More than 25 million Americans in rural areas live in what is known as a Mental Health Professional Shortage Area. This is an area where the number of mental providers is too scarce to meet the needs of the local population.

24.7% have been turned away when attempting to access mental health treatment in the United States.

Only 1 in 3 people across the globe with a formal diagnosis of depression received any form of official help in 2019.

45.8 million English adults repot they had some form of mental health disorder symptoms such as feelings of anxiety or depression in any given week.

61% of adults who have some form of mental health conditions report they don’t choose to access treatment for their condition.

14.3% of all deaths across the globe can be attributed to the person who died having some form of mental health disorder.

98% of people have agreed that people who suffer from any form of mental illness are likely to experience at least some form of stigma and discrimination over the course of their lifetime.

9 out of 10 people who report having at least one mental health problem have said that the kind of stigma and discrimination they have been subject to as a result of their mental health issues have had a negative effect on their lives.

14.1 million adults say they feel lonely at least some of the time in life.

59.4% of people with depression will likely to seek treatment for their disorder.

52.1% of people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder were likely to seek treatment.

51.6% of people with phobias were likely to seek official treatment for their mental health issue.

48.2% of people with generalized anxiety disorder were likely to seek official treatment for their mental health issue.

24.7% of people with a common mental disorder, not otherwise specified were likely to seek official treatment for their mental health issue.

20.9% people with a panic disorder were likely to seek official treatment for their mental health issue.

11.1% of all Americans with a mental health disorder were not covered by any form of health insurance.

5.5 million of all Americans who have been diagnosed with a mental health disorder do not have access to health insurance to pay for their treatments.

8.1% of all American teens who are covered by private health insurance have insurance that will not cover any form of mental health treatment.

70 to 90% of all people who are treated for mental health issues will find that such treatments are able to alleviate at least some of their mental health symptoms.

The effects of untreated mental illness in the United States are believed to be responsible for over 100 billion dollars in total costs each year.

The effects of untreated mental illness in the United States are believed to be responsible for over 100 billion dollars in total costs each year.

46.2% of all American adults who had some form of mental illness received formal treatment for the illness in 2020.

64.5% of all American adults who report they had at least one serious mental illness also report they were able to get effective treatment for their mental health issues in 2020.

It takes an average of 11 years between the onset of mental illness and when someone who is mentally ill can get formal help for their mental illness in the United States.

administrator
Medical Director Dr. Elizabeth Drew graduated from Hahnemann University School of Medicine and completed her family practice residency at Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown PA. In 2005, she opened her family medicine office in Doylestown, and in 2008 she treated her first patient for opiate addiction. Since then Dr. Drew has attained her board certification in Addiction Medicine, treated more than a thousand patients for addiction to opiates and alcohol, participated in programs to educate the community, traveled to Washington DC to educate our legislators, and served as Medical Director at some of the best addiction treatment programs in Pennsylvania. She understands that addiction is a chronic disease that no one would choose to have, and her treatment philosophy is based on respect, compassion, and empowerment. She is excited to be the Medical Director of MPower Wellness and work to provide superior addiction treatment in Chester County.

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