Addiction To Cell Phone Statistics

Smartphone Usage Statistics

81% of all Americans have at least one cellphone in their home. 55% of all Americans have two or more cellphones in their homes.

81% of all Americans have at least one cellphone in their home.

Experts predict that by 2025, 72% of all internet users across the globe will use their cellphone as their primary means of accessing the internet each day.

42% of all American adults believe they are wasting too much time using their cellphones each day.

44% of all American adults state they will check their work related emails even when they’re on a vacation or over the weekend.

50% of all American adults have admitted they have checked their cellphones when they were in bed with another person.

43% of all American adults have admitted they have checked their cellphones when they were on a date.

38% of all American adults have admitted they have checked their cellphones when they were sitting down with family members at the dinner table.

12% of all American adults have admitted they have checked their cellphones when they were in the shower or taking a bath.

55% all American adults have admitted they have checked their text messages when they were behind the wheel.

61% of all American adults have texted someone who were in the same room at the same time.

70% of all American adults will check their cellphones within 5 minutes of getting a notification even if they are doing something else at the same time.

36% of all Americans say they would give up a pet if it meant they could keep their cellphones.

68% of all Americans admit they check their work email on their cellphones before 8 in the morning.

53% of Americans state that in the event of a house fire, their cellphone would be the possession they would most want to save from the fire.

26% of all Americans state they are willing to put themselves in some form of danger in order to save their cellphones.

50% of Americans state they have never gone more than 24 hours without checking their cellphones at least once during that time.

30% of all Americans adults believe they would be more productive in life if they did not use their cellphones during the day or at night.

Many Americans admit that they open their cellphones over a 160 times each day of the week. This means the average American is checking their cellphone once every 9 minutes each day of the year.

The average person spends 4 hours and 10 minutes on their cellphone every day of the year.

63% of all cellphone users between the ages 18 of 29 have fallen asleep with a cellphone next to them at least once a week.

A typical user will click, tap, or swipes their cellphone 2,617 times every single day of the year.

43.5% of all users admit they are unlocking their cellphones a total of 51 to 100 times every single day.

87% of all cellphone users admit check their cellphone within 1 hour of getting up and 1 hour before they go to bed.

69% of all cellphone users check their cellphone within 5 minutes of waking up in the morning.

66% of cellphone users admit to having slept with their cellphone at least once in the past week.

86% of all cellphone users admit they are checking their cellphones even when they are speaking to their friends and family in person.

86% of all cellphone users admit they are checking their cellphones even when they are speaking to their friends and family in person.

87.8% of all cellphone users admit they feel a sense of anxiety if they accidentally leave their cellphones at home when on the road.

Signs and Symptoms of Smartphone Addiction

18% of all Americans strongly agreed with the statement that “not having my phone with them,” makes them feel a sense of anxiety.

51% of all cellphone users have symptoms that include strained interpersonal relationships and trouble focusing on work or school.

67% of all cellphone users have symptoms that include irritability when their cellphone is not nearby and intense boredom when not using a cellphone.

33% of all cellphone users have symptoms that include isolation from friends and increased feelings of loneliness and depression.

People who are depressed spend an average of 68 minutes on their cellphone each time they use it. People who are not depressed spend an average of 17 minutes on their cellphones each time they use it.

20% of all car accidents happened as a result of one or more parties using a cellphone while behind the wheel.

Dangers of Smartphone Addiction

1.1 million car crashes in the United States 2010 were caused because one or more parties involved was using a cellphone at the time.

160,000 American car crashes happened in the United States in 2020 because the driver was texting at the time of the accident.

35% of all Americans report finding it hard to concentrate at work because they don’t have access to their cellphones.

26% of all Americans report finding it hard to get to sleep or waking up early because they have an urge to check their cellphones.

Long term use of cellphones can put users at increased risk of anxiety.

40% of all American college students state that too much cellphone use made it harder for them to do well in school.

Overuse of cellphones at night has been found to decrease sleep quality by 44% in all age groups.

3 out of 5 American cellphone users admit they can’t go more than an hour without feeling the need to check their cellphones at least once.

3 out of 5 American cellphone users admit they can’t go more than an hour without feeling the need to check their cellphones at least once.

48% of Americans have reported feel a sense of fear or anxiety if they see their cellphone’s battery has fallen below 20% available power.

Cell Addiction Usage Statistics by Age

47% of all Americans parents are under the impression that their child has some form of smartphone addiction.

American teens who spend 5 or more hours a day every single day on some form of electronic devices are 71% more likely to be at risk from suicide.

67% of all American teachers believe their students are being distracted by cellphones during class time.

89% of all American parents surveyed take responsibility for supervising their child’s overall cellphone use at home.

33% of all American teens report they are spending more time socializing with their close friends online rather than in person.

41% of all American teenagers who were surveyed admit they are feeling frustrated by the number of text alerts they get on their cellphone each day.

60% of all American college students state they believe they personally have an addiction to their cellphones.

54% of young American adults admit they are constantly checking their cellphones even when doing something else.

44% of all Americans aged between 18 and 24 admit they have fallen asleep with a phone in their hands at some point in time.

Cell Addiction Usage Statistics by Gender

30.3% of all American males may have a cellphone addiction.

29.3% of all American females may have some form of cellphone addiction.

Girls are 12% more likely to be addicted to cellphone use than boys.

34% of American women in their twenties report feeling addicted to their cellphones.

34% of American women in their twenties report feeling addicted to their cellphones.

22% of all American men in their twenties report feeling addicted to their cellphones.

11% of all American women in their forties report feeling addicted to their cellphones.

9% of all American men in their forties report feeling addicted to their cellphones.

Teens and Cell Phone Addiction

50% of American teens report they feel that they are addicted to their cellphones in some way.

59% of American parents hold the opinion that their teens may have addition to their cellphones.

66% of all American parents feel that their teens are spending far too much time on their cellphones each day.

52% of all American teens agree they may be spending too much time on their cellphones each day.

80% of all American teens admit they are checking their cellphones once a hour each day.

36% of all American parents have argued with their children at least once a day about using their cellphones too much.

How to Help a Loved One With a Smartphone Addiction

82% of the American public holds the believe that smartphone addiction is real and people who suffer from it may require treatment.

84% of all American adults admit they can’t go an entire day without having a cellphones in their hands at least once.

People who were asked to go without their cellphones for 24 hours report feeling mental and physical distress as well as symptoms such as isolation, confusion and panic.

A loved one with a cellphone addiction may exhibit signs including always adding new apps to their cellphone, using cellphones at inappropriate times and losing track of time because they were on the cellphone at important moments during the day.

Downloading an addiction app has been shown to help 55% of cellphone addicts break free of their excessive cellphone use.

Downloading an addiction app has been shown to help 55% of cellphone addicts break free of their excessive cellphone use.

Deleted unwanted apps has been shown to help 25% of cellphone addicts break free of their excessive cellphone use.

Removing a cellphone from the bedroom has been shown to help 23% of cellphone addicts break free of their excessive cellphone use.

Scheduling an entire weekend without cellphone use has been shown to help 37% of cellphone addicts break free of their excessive cellphone use.

Teens who were asked to delete game apps on their phone report feeling 35% less likely to check their phones during the day.

administrator
Medical Director Dr. Elizabeth Drew graduated from Hahnemann University School of Medicine and completed her family practice residency at Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown PA. In 2005, she opened her family medicine office in Doylestown, and in 2008 she treated her first patient for opiate addiction. Since then Dr. Drew has attained her board certification in Addiction Medicine, treated more than a thousand patients for addiction to opiates and alcohol, participated in programs to educate the community, traveled to Washington DC to educate our legislators, and served as Medical Director at some of the best addiction treatment programs in Pennsylvania. She understands that addiction is a chronic disease that no one would choose to have, and her treatment philosophy is based on respect, compassion, and empowerment. She is excited to be the Medical Director of MPower Wellness and work to provide superior addiction treatment in Chester County.

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